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Harm Reduction in Prison: The Need for Prison Needle and Syringe Programs

Did you know that prisoners are legally entitled to health care that is equivalent to what is available on the outside? Community-based needle and syringe programs have been proven highly effective at reducing instances of HIV and hepatitis C. In some countries, needle and syringe programs also operate in prisons as an effective public health measure. Why are they not available in Canada’s federal prisons?

Join diverse experts to learn more about the need for harm reduction in Canadian federal prisons at this free panel discussion.

When? Wed June 3, 2015

What time? 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Where? Centretown Community Health Centre, Ottawa
420 Cooper Street (Bank and Summerset)
This is a wheelchair accessible location, with a gender neutral washroom.

Presenters:
Stéphanie Claivaz-Loranger, Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
Seth Clarke, Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network
Sharp Dopler, Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy
Emily van der Meulen, Department of Criminology, Ryerson University

Sponsored by:
Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
Centretown Community Health Centre
Department of Criminology, Ryerson University
DUAL (Drug User Advocacy League of Ottawa)
Native Youth Sexual Health Network
Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy
PASAN (Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network)
Unit for Critical Research in Health, University of Ottawa
University Research Chair in Forensic Nursing, University of Ottawa

Prison Health Now: Needle and Syringe Programs in Canada’s Prisons

Thursday, April 30th, 09:45 – 12:30
Host: Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN), Native Youth Sexual Health Network, Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network (PASAN), Ryerson University, Department of Criminology
Attendance: This session is open to all CAHR 2015 attendees. Pre-registration is required. RSVP to tgould@aidslaw.ca.
Join us at 9:45am on April 30 for coffee, and stay for an engaging panel discussion (starting at 10am) featuring community advocates, legal experts, and researchers who will discuss the current state of prisoner health in Canada; the specific challenges faced by Indigenous people who are incarcerated; and international research and evaluation on prison-based needle and syringe programs (PNSPs). This discussion will set the stage for a collaborative session whereby attendees will be given the opportunity to provide feedback on a draft sign-on statement in support of PNSPs, following which we will discuss related mobilization strategies to support the implementation of PNSPs in Canada.

These are pressing issues. In Canadian federal prisons, estimated HIV and HCV prevalence rates are considerably higher than for the general population. A key contributing factor is the sharing of equipment to inject drugs – sterile needles and syringes are currently not made available to prisoners who need them. Specific communities, in particular Indigenous people who are disproportionately incarcerated in Canada, experience a greater burden of this public health and human rights issue.

PNSPs offer access to sterile injection equipment and are an important evidence-based means of reducing HIV and HCV transmission in prison. Existing research on PNSPs shows highly favourable results. It is critical that PNSPs be implemented in Canada to safeguard prisoners’ right to health. We invite you to be part of the discussion.

On Point: Making Prison Needle and Syringe Programs Work in Canada

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/233425186819563

7:00–9:00 p.m., Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

On Point: Making Prison Needle and Syringe Programs Work in CanadaPanelists:

  • Daniela De Santis - Hindelbank Prison, Switzerland
  • Ruth Elwood Martin - University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  • Sandra Ka Hon Chu - Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, Toronto
  • Julie Thomas - Healing Our Nations, Nova Scotia

Ryerson University
Jorgenson Hall
Corner of Gerrard St. E and Victoria St.
2nd floor – accessible

JOIN US for a free lively panel discussion in support of prisoners' rights and justice. Panelists will discuss why prison needle and syringe programs are essential, how they are working in other countries, and how they might be implemented in Canada.

Sponsors:

  • Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network
  • Canadian Drug Policy Coalition
  • Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  • Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
  • Department of Criminology, Ryerson University
  • Native Youth Sexual Health Network
  • Office of the Dean, Faculty of Arts, Ryerson University
  • Office of the Vice President, Research and Innovation, Ryerson University
  • Ontario HIV Treatment Network
  • Ontario Public Interest Research Group (Toronto)
  • Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network
  • Ryerson Students' Union
  • Toronto Drug Strategy

On Point: The Need for Prison Needle and Syringe Programs

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/16tii15

On Point: The Need for Prison Needle and Syringe ProgramsWHEN: 3:00–6:00 p.m., Friday, October 18, 2013
WHAT: Free panel discussion followed by Q&A session and complimentary refreshments
WHO: 6 speakers, including German expert Dr. Heino Stöver, moderated by CBC national correspondent Maureen Brosnahan
WHERE: Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Auditorium, 6th floor, 155 College Street, Toronto (one block west of University Avenue)

Livestreaming

Join us for a free forum on prison needle and syringe programs, with presentations by leading prison health advocates, including Indigenous activists, a former federal prisoner, and academics from the United States and Germany. Learn about programs in over 60 prisons in 11 countries and the lawsuit against the Government of Canada over its ongoing refusal to implement needle and syringe programs in federal institutions (www.prisonhealthnow.ca).

This is a rare opportunity to learn about this important health initiative and engage in a lively discussion.

Sponsored by:

  • Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
  • Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network
  • Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network
  • Native Youth Sexual Health Network
  • Canadian Harm Reduction Network
  • The CIHR Social Research Centre in HIV Prevention

More Past Events

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Lenita

I know 13 women and men who caught hepatitis C or HIV while they were inside. They got it from sharing needles. Prison is not going to stop anybody from doing drugs. But [they] can stop people from sharing needles if they gave them out.”